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  #11  
Old 01-16-2011, 01:17 PM
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Perhaps there is a difference between the years. I have a '97 Elantra 1.8L and my old crank position sensor read about 490 to 500 ohms at room temperature. The newer one read about 510 ohms at room temperature. Not much difference.

About your problem, are you sure fuel is making it to the cylinders? Are you sure you have spark?
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  #12  
Old 01-16-2011, 01:34 PM
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I'm sure I have fuel to the cylinders because the spark plugs are getting soaked in fuel.

Originally, I didn't have spark and I replaced the coil with a new one. The car still wouldn't start. That's when I did some digging online and came across this forum and the many threads with the exact same symptoms all pointing to the crank sensor and virtually all universally being solved with the crank sensor.

So, the car now has new plugs, wires, coil, crank sensor, and still won't start. It cranks and cranks but will never quite start. I still don't seem to have spark, but it is my understanding that a bad crank sensor will prevent spark.

The odd thing is this car had no problems whatsoever prior to this (there were no occasional hard starts, no starts, stumbling, etc). It just suddenly wouldn't start the other day.

Anybody by any chance know the proper ohm range at the cam position sensor? It tests out at about 14 ohms. I understand the cam position sensor will also prevent spark/create similar no start symptoms.

Last edited by james92se; 01-16-2011 at 01:39 PM.
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  #13  
Old 01-16-2011, 01:41 PM
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You have all new ignition parts, but you still need to verify that you have spark. Get a spark testing tool and plug it into each wire and watch for the light to go on while an assistant cranks the engine. Or, you could just put a wire in each plug boot and hold it an inch from a metal surface and watch for a spark. Hold the plug boot with a pair of insulated pliers while doing this to avoid getting shocked.

Check all fuses and fusable links. If you do have spark and there are no blown fuses or fusable links, check to make sure the timing belt is turning.
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  #14  
Old 01-16-2011, 02:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bernd View Post
You have all new ignition parts, but you still need to verify that you have spark. Get a spark testing tool and plug it into each wire and watch for the light to go on while an assistant cranks the engine. Or, you could just put a wire in each plug boot and hold it an inch from a metal surface and watch for a spark. Hold the plug boot with a pair of insulated pliers while doing this to avoid getting shocked.

Check all fuses and fusable links. If you do have spark and there are no blown fuses or fusable links, check to make sure the timing belt is turning.
Hmm.. I just checked again and I do have spark now on all 4 plugs. Kind of weird because it sounds/acts just like previously when I didn't get any spark on the old coil. So I guess this verifies that the new crank sensor is working.

I had already taken the timing belt cover off to check for the remote possibility of a broken timing belt (belt has always been changed at 60k miles). I marked it now with some chalk just to verify that it is indeed turning. I checked all the fuses and fusible links, unless I'm missing some. The only ones I could find are on that little panel on the driver side kick panel and in the engine bay near the battery.

Puzzling indeed. Would the MAP or TPS cause a no-start?
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  #15  
Old 01-16-2011, 03:09 PM
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A bad MAP sensor would probably make it not start, a bad TPS probably not. Maybe the air flow sensor too? I don't have experience with these sensors for Hyundai applications. You might try searching issues with camshaft position sensors too.

Hey, at least its warm in TX. The low here tonight is projected to be -8 f. I'm not working in the garage again until it gets above 30 mid-week.
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  #16  
Old 01-16-2011, 03:43 PM
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I tried searching earlier (and even posted a thread) regarding cam vs crank position sensors with no luck. All the cam position threads I could find would up talking about crank position sensors and those all fixed everybody's problems.

If I now have spark, wouldn't that rule out crank and cam position sensors? I believe I read both would prevent spark if they were bad.

Although, I did notice just a few minutes ago while removing the injector harnesses to test the injectors (all tested at 15.2 ohms) that the harness end for the cam position sensor has a hairline crack around the perimeter of it. I'm not sure if this would cause it to fault out and I haven't been able to figure out the proper testing range from it. It ohms out at about 14 ohms but I can't find on the HMAservice site the proper specs.

It's drizzly today. Kind of crummy weather to be working outside on a car in. But it's "only" in the mid-40s today. Cold by my standards, probably warm by yours

Sure wish I could figure this out. This is my mom's car and I'm sick of lugging her around. I actually have three cars but they're all stick shift, and alas, she couldn't drive one if her life depended on it. lol
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  #17  
Old 01-16-2011, 05:12 PM
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From a Haynes manual: "The crank sensor monitors the position of the crankshaft, from which the computer is able to compute engine RPM. The cam sensor signals the computer when the #1 cylinder is at TDC on its compression stroke. This allows the computer to fire the injectors in the correct sequence and at the right time."

So, I'm guessing if you have a bad cam sensor, the injectors won't fire in the correct order. Though, you are getting some fuel into the cylinders so you think it would sound like it wants to start. Its possible that crack in the sensor housing is allowing something to ground out. You could try swapping out the sensor, or you could coat the sensor housing in a dielectric material to prevent it shorting out. Nail polish works in a pinch, preferably one with a ceramic base.

ebay motors is a good source for cheap, used parts. If you are out of options, you might look into having the computer tested by a shop that specializes in electrical issues, or a dealer.

Mid 40's here means its spring.. people start working in their gardens then.
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  #18  
Old 01-16-2011, 06:53 PM
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My brother is the manager at a parts place so he's going to let me borrow a scanner hopefully tomorrow. Hopefully this will go smoothly now - I scan it, get cam sensor code, replace cam sensor, car works properly, return crank sensor and make some of the money back. With my luck I'm not holding out any hope but we shall see!
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  #19  
Old 01-17-2011, 08:48 AM
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I think the car needs to be running to register a code. If there were codes previously stored, they should be read before doing anything else. Also, the cam sensor output is a voltage which can be measured, but only while the car is running.. it should be between 0 and 5 volts.

Good luck!
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  #20  
Old 01-18-2011, 07:48 PM
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My brother wasn't able to let me borrow a code scanner. I did return the crank sensor to him and got a new cam sensor. Hooked the cam sensor up, and it choked and huffed and puffed and finally started! It ran like crap for a minute or two, but finally smoothed out. The check engine light came on but went away after a battery reset.

Here's the ever so slight crack I was speaking of on the old/bad cam sensor:

Click the image to open in full size.

Would never think that tiny little crack would cause so much trouble!
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Old 01-18-2011, 07:48 PM
 
 
 
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01, 99, accent, cam, car, code, codes, elantra, hyundai, prevent, sensor, sonata, spark, start, tool


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